Epigenetics has shown that embryos developed in the laboratory, or in their later development within a uterus, behave differently than if they had developed in their natural environment or in a different womb, according to experts gathered at the XVII Forum. North (Days of Human Reproduction), organized by Merck in Soria.

“We have progressed in knowing how some embryos developed in the laboratory, or in their later development inside a uterus, behave differently than if they had developed in their natural environment – the fallopian tube – or, what is more interesting, In a different womb, in other words, the same embryo would produce different beings in different mothers, “said José Vicente Peñuelas, head of the Gynecology Service of the Hospital Complex of Soria.

In any case, he continues, there are still areas in which progress can continue to be recorded thanks to a more in-depth study of the cases, such as the case of choosing the best embryo transfer method. “Current studies seem to indicate that a deferred transfer could increase the successes of assisted reproduction treatments, although cases in which a fresh transfer should be used are not perfectly defined,” he emphasized.

That said, the coordinator, along with Dr. Maria Angeles Rubio, has indicated that in order to achieve the benefits of a deferred transfer, the embryo cryopreservation technique must be excellent, so as not to lose any of them in this step.

HABITUAL TECHNIQUES

On the other hand, experts have recalled that one of the most common techniques in assisted reproduction is intracytoplasmic injection (ICSI), included in the treatment of in vitro fertilization, which allows children to have couples who could not achieve it. natural way
“Therefore, the system is strengthened, which could increase the risks of pregnancy and childbirth, but in most cases the pregnancy is the same as if it had been achieved naturally.” The obstetric risks only increase in one year. a small percentage of the cases, and thanks to knowing these risks, do not pose a significant threat, “Dr. Peñuelas has argued.

Finally, another concern in assisted reproduction laboratories that has been alleviated over time is that of the identification of samples and their traceability to minimize identification errors and detect possible causes of failures.

“The traditional traceability protocols left a small margin for human error, but with the new automated traceability systems this possibility of error has practically disappeared”, said the head of the Gynecology Service of the Complex Hospitalary of  Soria.